Holiday Recipes Black-Eyed Peas

Published on December 31st, 2013 | by Heather Carr

0

Black-Eyed Peas for the New Year





Black-Eyed Peas

Black-eyed peas are a traditional part of a New Year menu. Some say eating black-eyed peas on New Year Day will bring luck throughout the year. These black-eyed peas can be made in a slow-cooker.

Black-eyed peas have about 200 calories per one-cup serving (before you add the other ingredients in the recipe) and good quantities of calcium, folate, vitamin A, and protein and fiber.

A traditional New Year menu includes black-eyed peas, greens, and cornbread. The black-eyed peas are said to bring luck. The greens, such as collards or kale, represent household finances. Cornbread is the color of gold and represents spending cash or coins. Sweet tea and water go well with the meal.

Looking for a greens recipe?  Try Roasted Root Vegetable Kale Salad (recipe and video) or Braised Collard Greens.

For cornbread, try this cornbread recipe.

When preparing dried black-eyed peas, or any dried legume, remember to pick through the peas and pull out any stones or other debris. The stones are the same color as the peas, so check carefully. After removing all the foreign objects, rinse the black-eyed peas. There’s no need to soak the peas, since they’re going into a slow-cooker.

Black-Eyed Peas

1 pound dried black-eyed peas
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/3 pound onion
3 cups water or broth
4 cloves garlic
1 cup molasses (or 1 cup dark brown sugar and ½ cup water or broth)
1 cup barbecue sauce

Chop onion and garlic fine, but keep them separate. Heat vegetable oil in skillet over medium heat and add onions. Saute onions until a little soft, two or three minutes. Add the garlic and saute another two minutes.

Put all the ingredients into the slow cooker, except ½ cup of the barbecue sauce. Cook on high for 5-7 hours or on low for 9-11 hours. About thirty minutes before the time is up, add the second ½ cup barbecue sauce and stir in. Cover and cook the remaining thirty minutes.

Serve with greens and cornbread.

Black-eyed peas photo via Shutterstock

Keep up with the latest sustainable food news by signing up for our free newsletter. CLICK HERE to sign up!



Tags: , , , , ,


About the Author

Heather Carr loves food, politics, and innovative ways to make the world a better place. She counts Jacques Pepin and Speed Racer among her inspirations. You can find her on Facebook or .



Comments are closed.

Back to Top ↑