Author name: Kim Ukura

Kim Ukura is a second year master's student in the University of Wisconsin, Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication where she is studying community and local journalism. Eventually, she hopes to write, edit, or blog for a small, local news organization. When she's not doing her homework, Kim also reads and reviews books on her blog Sophisticated Dorkiness (http://sophisticateddorkiness.com).

Food Safety: Another Benefit of Healthy School Lunch Programs?

At the risk of sounding repetitive, I’d like to add to the growing list of the benefits for healthy school lunches and school lunch reform that we blogged about yesterday. On Tuesday, USA TODAY ran an investigative story about tainted school lunches that shows how safety lapses in food production or distribution can put children …

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“Our Daily Bread” Uses Silence to Comment on Industrial Food

Last weekend Madison was host to Tales from Planet Earth, a local environmental film festival screening 50 films over three days. One film I saw was Our Daily Bread, a German film about the industrial food production and high-tech farming that managed to comment on the process without actually doing any talking. The image above, …

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School Lunch Reform and a Food Critic’s Take on Chicken Nuggets

Chicken nuggets. Taco salad. Pizza. Cartons of milk. Hot dogs. Mystery meat. These foods were all staples of my elementary and high school cafeterias, despite clear guidelines about the nutritional benefits for school meals. Efforts to reform school lunch got a boost Tuesday when Institute of Medicine of the National Academies released “School Meals: Building …

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Advice to “Eat Breakfast” Supported by New Brain Imaging Study

Common dieting advice suggests eating breakfast because it can jump start your metabolism and helps prevent you from eating more later in the day. Researchers in London may have finally figured out why — skipping a morning meal can fool your brain into thinking the body actually wants high-calorie foods, which, if eaten too often, …

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