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Tag: science

Just Say No to GMOs

The Atlantic is on the case! In an article ominously entitled “The Very Real Danger of Genetically Modified Foods,” author Ari LeVaux exposes what’s lurking in our veggies. Dun dun dunnnn. Here are some very major points to take away from the article, though many implications are yet to come.

Non GMO Doesn’t Mean Anti-Science

Whenever we publish a piece around here talking about our issues with genetically engineered food, we get at least one comment (often from biotech lobbyists) bashing that author as being anti-science. I understand that there’s lots of money in biotechnology and these people are trying to protect their livelihood, but I kind of resent the implication that supporting the non GMO movement means I hate science.

Using Neural Networks to Improve Agriculture

Researchers are using sophisticated image processing techniques to better identify plants so that less herbicide can be used on our conventionally grown crops. This is obviously a good thing, as herbicides can be quite nasty to the environment and human health.

GMO Scientists Under Attack (Film Trailer)

In honor of non-GMO month, folks from the Institute for Responsible Technology have shared a great film with us, Scientists Under Attack, and a lot of information to go with it.

Monsanto GM Sugar Beets (and Alfalfa) Approval: Why This is Bad News

We have a great post going up tomorrow morning on the USDA’s recent approval of Monsanto’s genetically modified (GM) — “genetically engineered” (“GE”) if you live in Europe — sugar beets and GM alfalfa from Ken Roseboro, editor of The Organic & Non-GMO Report. It will cover health concerns (based on scientific studies), environmental concerns, legal concerns, considerable threats to organic farmers and consumers, and the USDA’s decision to ignore public concerns and comments from hundreds of thousands of U.S. citizens. But I wanted to chime in on this with a few comments of my own.

To Eat Less, Imagine Eating More

This is an interesting one, couldn’t pass it up. A new study published in Science in December has found that if you think about eating a lot of a food, just think about it, the next time you have the opportunity to eat it you will eat less than you would otherwise.

Scientists Develop a Food Printer

It almost sounds like a replicator from Star Trek: you load in food “inks,” and out comes a printed meal, but scientists at Cornell University are developing a machine that does just that.

Dairy-based Plastics

Food packaging is perhaps one of the biggest drains on resources in our society.Β  We use petroleum to make it, use it once, possibly recycle it, but it has a [ … ]

Sperm Quantity and Quality Hit Hard by BPA

A recent study of male Chinese workers has found that the infamous endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) causes sperm counts and concentrations to drop. Additionally, it found that the “quality” [ … ]