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Green Diva’s Guide to Delicious Living: Sustainable Lunch Break

Mickey & Minnie on lunch break Having just taken a new job which requires me to be on-site about 10 hours per day, I’ve had to make some serious adjustments as I have been working from a home-office primarily for the past 8 years.

I’ve been very spoiled in terms of my ability to stroll into my kitchen, open the refrigerator, and prepare any type of lunch from the bounty of leftovers or whatever I happen to have stocked at that time.

Now I have to be more strategic about the whole thing. Because I’m used to preparing most of my meals and don’t eat too much take-out or processed foods, I am a bit more high-maintenance when it comes to what many folks consider a simple lunch break.

In addition to my relatively high health & nutritional standards for my meals, I also want to maintain as much of my sustainable kitchen concepts as possible whether I’m home or not.

My co-workers think I’m a little nutty (earthy-crunchy I think), but that’s okay.

Here are some of the things that help me feel better about re-usable bagging it for lunch:

β€’ Glass containers (pyrex has a nice collection)
β€’ Mug (for tea)
β€’ Silverware from home (keep a full set that I wash and leave in office)
β€’ Sigg bottle (for water – we have a great filtered water system @ office)
β€’ Cloth napkin
β€’ Re-usable shopping bag or tote

Here’s a site that had some good suggestions for making a sustainable lunch.

Here’s a site that has some interesting statistics on lunch-related waste.

I’ve started cooking a few things on Sunday that become staples in my lunch for the first part of the week at least and it always includes a big batch of brown rice pilaf.

I’ll include easy β€˜green’ lunch recipes in future posts.

Meanwhile, I’d really like to hear about other people’s creative ideas for getting more sustainable with workplace lunches.

2 comments
  1. Heather

    I pack my lunch each day also and it’s sometimes hard or not affordable to find glass containers (I love soup for lunch). So I started saving all my glass peanut butter jars, jelly jars, mayo jars and washing them all in the dishwasher. They are the perfect size for a bowl of soup. I also bring one of those ice cream spoons (smaller head with a long handle) in my lunchbox. It makes it easier to get into the jar as I’m eating. Another tip, if you have a canning funnel around, that sits nicely in some of these wider mouthed jars (like a peanut butter or mayo jar) and I ladle my soup in. It keeps me from making a mess.

  2. Nick

    Good evening,
    I became a raw vegan nearly 10 years ago, originally for the health benefits but I’ve since been feeling pretty good about all the environmental benefits too. No expense for cooking fuel (any heating is by sun drying), very little packaging since most of my meals are simple whole fruits, veggies, nuts and seeds. Anything I don’t eat I compost. This Summer I’ll get most of my produce from a CSA so I’ll stop having the produce stickers.

    I’m finding my mental clarity and physical energy have gone through the roof, so I’m making better decisions about all my other environmental impacts too. In case anyone was going to ask my reasons for doing this were entirely selfish and rational (I’m an engineer and that influences all my decisions) – but it turns out to be selfish in the same sense that putting on your oxygen mask before helping your children with theirs. By being selfish in a self-constructive way I’m a better servant to my family and community.

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