Browsing the "urban agriculture" Tag

150 Acre Detroit Urban Farming Project is Coming

September 12th, 2014 | by Chris DeMorro

Last year, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder finally approved a plan to allow Hantz Woodlands to buy and transform 150 acres of empty or decrepit Detroit lots, and turn them into the world’s largest urban farm. The Detroit urban farming project has since made great progress, and could serve to inspire other cities to do the same


Is all urban farming created equal?

September 3rd, 2014 | by Jeff McIntire-Strasburg

Is all urban farming created equal? Let's look at two interesting takes on the urban farm and how sustainable they really are


Urban Farming in Mexico City

December 10th, 2012 | by Becky Striepe

We love a good example of urban farming around here! Urban farms are such a wonderful way to transform unused or blighted spaces in big cities into lush, food-producing patches of land (or rooftop, or wall!)


Real Food in the Mainstream: Will Allen on the Colbert Report

June 15th, 2012 | by Becky Striepe

Urban farming advocates like Will Allen and the nonprofit he works with called Growing Power are looking to change that by building farms in cities that grow lots of food in sometimes not a lot of space. Allen wrote a book on his urban farming efforts: The Good Food Revolution, and on Tuesday night he talked to Stephen Colbert about urban farming, food deserts, and kohlrabi. Check it out!


Is Locally Grown Food a Booming Business?

November 21st, 2011 | by Patricia Larenas

The total dollars for local food sales are much bigger than expected- a whopping $4.8 billion in 2008, and almost double that number is predicted for 2010 according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) report. And even though the percentage of local food sales are small when compared to total food sales nationally, they are significant for their impact at the local level.


Heirloom Bean Project Wrap-Up

November 14th, 2011 | by Patricia Larenas

Now that fall is here the results of my summer heirloom bean project are in: a total yield of almost four pounds of beautiful dry beans of several types. In all I grew seven runner beans and five varieties of "common" beans in my suburban garden. Why the excitement? I think it's fantastic to be able to grow a healthy, delicious, protein source in my own back and front yards. Besides that, I love the versatility of bean dishes, and the varieties are endless if you search beyond the grocery store. You can grow your own and enjoy cooking them all winter



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