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Published on July 24th, 2013 | by Heather Carr

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What If We’re Wrong About Diabetes – Peter Attia

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Peter Attia

What if we’re wrong about diabetes? Surgeon and cancer researcher Peter Attia asks that question in this TED talk.

Insulin determines whether the body will store or burn the calories it takes in. When cells become resistant to insulin, the insulin is unable to do its job properly. More calories get stored as fat and a person has a hard time keeping extra weight off.

Most researchers believe that obesity is the cause of insulin resistance. Peter Attia wonders if that is backwards. What if insulin resistance is the cause of obesity? What if we should be looking for the cause of insulin resistance in order to improve people’s health?

He suspects that our excessive consumption of refined grains and sugars is to blame. He is doing research to try to determine which comes first – the insulin resistance or the consumption of processed foods.




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About the Author

Heather Carr loves food, politics, and innovative ways to make the world a better place. She counts Jacques Pepin and Speed Racer among her inspirations. You can find her on Facebook or .



One Response to What If We’re Wrong About Diabetes – Peter Attia

  1. Hi there, readers. Modern rates of sugar consumption – especially via sugary drinks – are a key driver of global obesity and type 2 diabetes, together the greatest public-health challenge of our times:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20693348

    In an effort to counter these disturbing trends – especially amongst young people and Indigenous peoples – I am calling for a ban on all sugary drinks in all schools in all nations:http://www.australianparadox.com/pdf/Sugary-Drinks-Ban.pdf

    If after assessing the facts you think this proposal has merit, please forward it to parents, students, teachers, principals and heads of schools, nurses, doctors, dentists and others involved in public health and education.

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