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Published on January 15th, 2013 | by Jennifer Kaplan

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The World’s First Probiotic Coffee

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Tipton Mills of Buffalo, NY recently announced that it has created the world’s first probiotic instant coffee.

Consumers are now able to get a daily dose of probiotics with their morning joe, specifically in Tipton Mills private label and direct-to-consumer instant coffees and other beverages.

Probiotics are commonly associated with yogurt, but now a small company called Tipton Mills has launched a coffee brand using Ganeden Biotech’s GanedenBC30 (Bacillus coagulans GBI-30 6086). GanedenBC30 can survive heat, cold and other conditions that destroy most probiotics and this has made warm probiotic beverages possible. In clinical studies, it has been shown to support digestive and immune health as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle. According to Tipton Mills, one cup of probiotic coffee can deliver up to 5 times the amount of active probiotic cultures as those in a single serving of yogurt.

According to Ganeden Biotech Vice President of Business Development Mike Bush:

“Coffee is one of the two largest selling beverages in the world. Our goal is to improve quality of life through probiotics, and it just makes sense to add it to something that consumers are already enjoying on a daily basis.”

According to the Tipton Mills website, which sites the National Institutes of Health, probiotics are live microorganisms, similar to beneficial bacteria, that are found in our bodies. Many research studies show probiotics can help support healthy digestion, immunity, stress levels, women’s health, and oral health.

For a limited time, you can get a  6-serving sample of Tipton Mills probiotic coffee free by signing up for Tipton Mills email newsletter (while supplies last).



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About the Author

Jennifer Kaplan writes regularly about sustainable food and wine, the intersection of food and marketing and food politics for EatDrinkBetter.com and is the author of Greening Your Small Business (November 2009, Penguin Group (USA)). She was been named one of The 16 Women You Must Follow on Twitter for Green Business. She has four kids, a dog, a hamster and an MBA - find her on .



  • http://vibrantwellnessjournal.com Andrea @ Vibrant Wellness Journal

    Hmmm, I am not sure how I feel about this! Yes, probiotics are great, and I am a big fan of yogurt, kefir, kombucha and even probiotic supplementation, but what happens when you take something so far outside of it’s natural living state and put it into (let’s be honest here) a not-so-healthy drink. Though the numbers cited by the company are high, I just can’t think that this type of supplementation is healthy- the synergies in the living foods that grow/create probiotics surely have a cumulative effect on our systems, and I don’t think focusing on one single strain and adding it to coffee (!) can be all that effective. That’s my two cents!

    • http://glueandglitter.com/main Becky Striepe

      This crossed my mind, too. Also, probiotics can help with…er…”blockage”… which makes me wonder if adding that power to coffee would have undesirably explosive effects!

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