Farmers Market Fare food stamps farmers market. cc photo by flickr user chasbot

Published on September 7th, 2010 | by Becky Striepe


Farmers Markets and Food Stamps

food stamps farmers market

Did you know that many farmers markets take food stamps?

Many of the markets here in the Atlanta area have been taking food stamps for years, and it looks like markets other cities are doing the same. The photo above is from the West Seattle Farmers Market, which also accepts food stamps.

Organic Nation produced a quickie video highlighting a Chicago farmers market that’s now accepting food stamps:

Benefits for Customers and Farmers

We’ve seen that less access to fresh food contributes to higher obesity rates, and it’s poorer consumers that tend to lack this access. Not only do farmers markets add an option for fresh, often organic local produce, the prices are often very competitive. Folks can stretch those food dollars while stocking up on healthy eats for themselves and their families.

Times are tough, and farmers markets aren’t immune to the effects of the economic downturn. By taking food stamps, they’re able to broaden their customer base, which hopefully translates to better sales for the farmers.

This trend feels like a win for everyone!

Do any local farmers markets by you accept food stamps? I’d love to get a list going in the comments!

h/t: Organic Nation

Image Credit: Creative Commons photo by chasbot

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About the Author

My name is Becky Striepe (rhymes with “sleepy”), and I am a crafts and food writer from Atlanta, Georgia with a passion for making our planet a healthier, happier, and more compassionate place to live. My mission is to make vegan food and crafts accessible to everyone!. If you like my work, you can also find me on Twitter, Facebook, and .

8 Responses to Farmers Markets and Food Stamps

  1. Duane says:

    We take food stamps (EBT cards) at our 2 markets in Decatur Georgia. We are part of the Wholesome Wave program which doubles the value of EBT purchases so users can get 2x as much good food. Doing so has put an additional $75 per market per week on average in the pockets of our vendors. Everybody wins.

  2. Debra Tropp says:

    Our national farmers market engine at, with over 6,100 entries, lists more than 700 markets that accept SNAP (former food stamp) benefits

  3. taxed says:

    Eat, drink better and pay for it with money earned by somebody else. Can’t beat that.

  4. Pingback: Raising Our Awareness about Food Insecurity – EcoLocalizer

  5. Pingback: Raising Our Awareness about Food Insecurity in the U.S. « Pull The Root, Plant the Seed

  6. Pingback: 4 Tips to Eat Organic on a Budget | Care2 Healthy & Green Living

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